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Also assume that a ≠ 1, b ≠ 1. Definitions. 1. log a x = N means that a N = x. 2. log x means log 10 x. All log a rules apply for log. When a logarithm is written without a base it means common logarithm. 3. ln x means log e x, where e is about All log a rules apply for ln.

Post as a guest Name. I am studying non-simple mathematical operations that can resolve this issue. I studied this question in my vocation and I concludes this not possible. Nov 13, 8. Sign up or log in Sign up using Google.

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Note that log b (a) + log b (c) = log b (ac), where a, b, and c are arbitrary constants. Suppose that one wants to approximate the 44th Mersenne prime, 2 32,, −1. To get the base logarithm, we would multiply 32,, by log 10 (2), getting 9,, = 9,, +
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There is no expansion for it. [math]Log(a/b) = log(a)-log(b)[/math] This is the formula.
Uses worked examples to demonstrate how to use log rules to expand (or break apart) logarithmic expressions from one log with a complicated argument to many logs, each with simple arguments.

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Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 8. Oo thats clever, nice one: FunkyDwarf , Nov 13, Nov 14, 9. Apr 18, Simple , Apr 18, May 13, I studied this question in my vocation and I concludes this not possible. There is no operation Mathematics simple that can solves that question.

I am studying non-simple mathematical operations that can resolve this issue. Assume such a function gol x , did exist. A simple calculation shows that sqrt 2 sqrt log 6 is not equal to log 5.

So no such function can exist AUMathTutor , May 13, May 15, Mark44 , May 15, CRGreathouse , May 15, Your name or email address: But who knows, perhaps under certain circumstances By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service , privacy policy and cookie policy , and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Jeel Shah 5, 10 51 Peter 41 1 2 4. But you can use the logarithmic series expansion if needed. There is nothing pleasant. It is possible to imagine a situation where this could be useful. You could expand using the Taylor series You could try though:

Log rules can be used to simplify (or, more correctly, to "condense") expressions, to "expand" expressions, or to solve for values. We'll start with expansion. Expand log 3 (2x). The property that log (a*b) = log a + log b is only useful because it transforms a multiplication operation into an addition operation. log (a+b) already involves only an addition, so it makes no sense to have any further expansion. Note that log b (a) + log b (c) = log b (ac), where a, b, and c are arbitrary constants. Suppose that one wants to approximate the 44th Mersenne prime, 2 32,, −1. To get the base logarithm, we would multiply 32,, by log 10 (2), getting 9,, = 9,, +